Home » Posts tagged 'adenine'

Tag Archives: adenine

Recent Article Published: Unique H-bonding of Adenine with oxidatively damaged base 8-oxoguanosine enables specific recognition and repair by DNA glycosylase MutY.

Recent Article Published by Sheila David’s Lab: Unique Hydrogen Bonding of Adenine with the Oxidatively Damaged Base 8-Oxoguanine Enables Specific Recognition and Repair by DNA Glycosylase MutY.

Majumdar, C.; Mckibbin, P.L.; Krajewski, A.E.; Manlove, A.H.; Lee, J.K.; David, S.S.
J. Am. Soc. 2020. 142, 48, 20340–20350.

      DNA repair protein MutY employs specific interactions to differentiate OG:A basepairs from canonical G:C and T:A basepairs. Prior work from our lab has focused on understanding the structural requirements of OG on lesion recognition and catalysis, and we have shown that MutY relies on the exocyclic 2-amino group of OG to identify and distinguish OG:A from other basepairs. Additionally, we’ve shown that OG binding induces conformational changes that influence A excision.

     This new work uses structure-activity relationships (SARs) to identify the structural features of A that influence OG:A recognition, verification, base excision, and overall cellular repair. We correlate observed in vitro MutY activity on A analogue substrates with their experimental and calculated acidities to provide mechanistic insight into the factors influencing MutY base excision efficiency. Our results herein can be used to guide future design of MutY/MUTYH specific probes to monitor the activity, or lack thereof, of MutY/MUTYH variants. These results can also applied toward the development of MUTY/MUTYH specific inhibitors that may find utility in cancer therapeutics.

Click on the link or graphical abstract to find out more!

https://pubs.acs.org/doi/abs/10.1021/jacs.0c06767#

 

RSS Science Daily News

  • A new study reveals that marine cyanobacteria communicate June 6, 2024
    A breakthrough study changes the way we understand cyanobacteria, which are essential for the sustenance of life. The study shows that these organisms do not operate in isolation, but rather physically interact through membrane-nanotubes, which function as exchange bridges between cells.
  • Younger children in school year are more commonly diagnosed with ADHD than their older classmates, says new study June 6, 2024
    New research has found that teachers may be attributing signs of age-related immaturity in children, to conditions such as Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) or Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). The results of the study showed that the youngest students in a class, with birth dates just before the school entry cut-off date, were overrepresented among children receiving […]
  • Researchers upend theory about the formation of the Milky Way Galaxy June 6, 2024
    Research reveals a shocking discovery about the history of our universe: the Milky Way Galaxy's last major collision occurred billions of years later than previously thought.
  • Exotic black holes could be a byproduct of dark matter June 6, 2024
    In the first quintillionth of a second, the universe may have sprouted microscopic black holes with enormous amounts of nuclear charge, MIT physicists propose. The gravitational pull from these tiny, invisible objects could potentially explain all the dark matter that we can't see today.
  • Regenerating damaged heart cells in mice June 6, 2024
    Scientists have discovered a way to regenerate damaged heart muscle cells in mice, a development which may provide a new avenue for treating congenital heart defects in children and heart attack damage in adults, according to a new study.

Contact:

Dr. Sheila S. David
ssdavid@ucdavis.edu
(530)-752-4280

Department of Chemistry
One Shields Ave.
Davis, CA 95616