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Elizabeth Rose Lotsof

Elizabeth Rose Lotsof

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Education: 

B.A. Chemistry: Biochemistry Concentration, Cum Laude

Minors in Educational studies and Anthropology, Washington University in St. Louis

From: Chicago, Illinois

Joined the David Lab: January 2017

Outside of lab: I enjoy kickboxing, skiing, music concerts, dancing and baking.

Research in David Lab:

The NEIL family of DNA glycosylases are critical enzymes to maintaining the integrity of the genome. They initiate the base excision repair (BER) pathway by cleaving the N-glycosidic bond between the oxidatively damaged base and the sugar. NEIL1 and NEIL3 have a unique ability to excise a wide variety of substrates and remove lesions from alternative DNA contexts. Because of these abilities, I am currently evaluating the ability of NEIL1 and NEIL3 to excise oxidative base damage from G-quadruplex structures. G-quadruplexes DNA structures that occur in sequences that contain three or four adjacent guanines, which can Hoogsteen hydrogen-bond together to from a G-quartet. These G-quartets will stack together with a central K+ or Na+ ion to stabilize the structure in a variety of conformations. What makes the G-quadruples so notable is their location in the promoter sequences of many oncogenes and BER glycosylases, NEIL1 and NEIL3, and they have been implicated in down- or up-regulating gene transcription. Additionally, due to their high G content, G-quadruplexes are prime spots for oxidative damage necessitating repair by the BER pathway. NEIL’s ability to cleave from such structures suggest a dynamic relationship between DNA repair and gene regulation.

Previous Research Experience:

I previously worked as a Research Coordinator for the NorthShore University Health System’s Division of Urogynecology, where I studied the factors that impact patient persistence with urological medication and the relationship between different Urogynecological surgeries and their post-operative results, in addition to managing ongoing clinical trials.  In addition to my research work, I am passionate about science communication and accessibility and helping those with rare genetic diseases. I hope to one day have a career with a biotechnology company focused on therapeutics for individuals with rare genetic diseases.

RSS Science Daily News

  • Mars habitability limited by its small size, isotope study suggests September 20, 2021
    Researchers measured the potassium isotope compositions of Martian meteorites in order to estimate the presence, distribution, and abundance of volatile elements and compounds, including water, on Mars, finding that Mars has lost more potassium than Earth but retained more potassium than the moon or the asteroid 4-Vesta; the results suggest that rocky planets with larger […]
  • Cancer cells’ unexpected genetic tricks for evading the immune system September 16, 2021
    In a surprising new finding in mice, researchers have discovered that many genes linked to human cancer block the body's natural defense against malignancies.
  • Plants evolved complexity in two bursts -- with a 250-million-year hiatus September 16, 2021
    A new method for quantifying plant evolution reveals that after the onset of early seed plants, complexity halted for 250 million years until the diversification of flowering plants about 100 million years ago.
  • Can fruit fly research help improve survival of cancer patients? September 16, 2021
    Scientists don't really know what kills many cancer patients, but fruit fly research could provide answers. By following flies with tumors up to the point of death, researchers have discovered chemicals produced by tumors that shorten life span apart from the damage done locally to critical organs. This suggests a novel strategy for extending a […]
  • Climate change threatens base of polar oceans' bountiful food webs September 16, 2021
    The cold polar oceans give rise to some of the largest food webs on Earth. And at their base are microscopic, photosynthetic algae. But human-induced climate change, a new study suggests, is displacing these important cold-water communities of algae with warm-adapted ones, a trend that threatens to destabilize the delicate marine food web and change […]

Contact:

Dr. Sheila S. David
ssdavid@ucdavis.edu
(530)-752-4280

Department of Chemistry
One Shields Ave.
Davis, CA 95616