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Elizabeth Rose Lotsof

Elizabeth Rose Lotsof

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Education: 

B.A. Chemistry: Biochemistry Concentration, Cum Laude

Minors in Educational studies and Anthropology, Washington University in St. Louis

From: Chicago, Illinois

Joined the David Lab: January 2017

Outside of lab: I enjoy kickboxing, skiing, music concerts, dancing and baking.

Research in David Lab:

The NEIL family of DNA glycosylases are critical enzymes to maintaining the integrity of the genome. They initiate the base excision repair (BER) pathway by cleaving the N-glycosidic bond between the oxidatively damaged base and the sugar. NEIL1 and NEIL3 have a unique ability to excise a wide variety of substrates and remove lesions from alternative DNA contexts. Because of these abilities, I am currently evaluating the ability of NEIL1 and NEIL3 to excise oxidative base damage from G-quadruplex structures. G-quadruplexes DNA structures that occur in sequences that contain three or four adjacent guanines, which can Hoogsteen hydrogen-bond together to from a G-quartet. These G-quartets will stack together with a central K+ or Na+ ion to stabilize the structure in a variety of conformations. What makes the G-quadruples so notable is their location in the promoter sequences of many oncogenes and BER glycosylases, NEIL1 and NEIL3, and they have been implicated in down- or up-regulating gene transcription. Additionally, due to their high G content, G-quadruplexes are prime spots for oxidative damage necessitating repair by the BER pathway. NEIL’s ability to cleave from such structures suggest a dynamic relationship between DNA repair and gene regulation.

Previous Research Experience:

I previously worked as a Research Coordinator for the NorthShore University Health System’s Division of Urogynecology, where I studied the factors that impact patient persistence with urological medication and the relationship between different Urogynecological surgeries and their post-operative results, in addition to managing ongoing clinical trials.  In addition to my research work, I am passionate about science communication and accessibility and helping those with rare genetic diseases. I hope to one day have a career with a biotechnology company focused on therapeutics for individuals with rare genetic diseases.

RSS Science Daily News

  • Skydiving salamanders live in world's tallest trees May 23, 2022
    Researchers have documented in a vertical wind tunnel the amazing ability of one species of salamander -- which spends its entire life in the tops of redwoods -- to parachute, glide and maneuver in mid-air. Ground-dwellers, on the other hand, freak out during free-fall. The salamander's skydiving skills are likely a way to steer back […]
  • New research may explain unexpected effects of common painkillers May 23, 2022
    Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) such as ibuprofen and aspirin are widely used to treat pain and inflammation. But even at similar doses, different NSAIDs can have unexpected and unexplained effects on many diseases, including heart disease and cancer.
  • Planets of binary stars as possible homes for alien life May 23, 2022
    Nearly half of Sun-size stars are binary. According to new research, planetary systems around binary stars may be very different from those around single stars. This points to new targets in the search for extraterrestrial life forms.
  • The limits of vision: Seeing shadows in the dark May 23, 2022
    A specific retinal pathway enables mice to detect incredibly dim shadows -- nearly reaching the limit of what's physically possible. The same circuit is in human eyes, which might enable researchers to probe visual diseases at unprecedented resolution.
  • A family of termites has been traversing the world's oceans for millions of years May 23, 2022
    A comprehensive family tree, based on DNA sequences, has revealed that drywood termites have made at least 40 oceanic journeys over the last 50 million years to reach far flung landmasses.

Contact:

Dr. Sheila S. David
ssdavid@ucdavis.edu
(530)-752-4280

Department of Chemistry
One Shields Ave.
Davis, CA 95616